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Aloe and Friends

I am not a professional nor an expert in Aloe taxonomy. Any help with ID and spelling are always welcome. To up-date my list I've been using many books, journals, catalogs and other web-sites. It's been helpful, but I have more work to do. I only ship to the main 48 States. I can ship in the winter. I do offer 72+ hour heat packs for $3.00 each. Please read the front page for ordering information.

    Aristaloe aristata - Synonym: Aloe aristata. One of the smaller Aloes, clumping, stemless, sawtoothed succulent leaves with soft bristly tips. Needs well draining soil. Can be cold hardy down to 20F for a short time. Habitat: SouthAfrica & Lesotho. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3, #4 with pups @ $10.00 each

   Aloe brevifolia striata variegation - Belonging to the Aloe perfoliata/mitriformis group. These has nice creamy stripped leaves.This is one of the best pot aloes and one of the more cold and moisture tolerant aloes. Should be able to withstand light frosts. In time it offsets to form a large cluster of heads and is a long blooming species. Aloe brevifolia is a coastal species and grows just north of Cape Agulhas, to the east of Cape Town - from Bredarsdorp to the Riversdale area. - left to right - #1, #2, #3, #4 with pups @ $13.00 each

   Aloe dichotoma - South Africa northern Cape region and Namibia. Namaqualand and Bushmanland. from near Nieuwoudtville northwards into Namibia and eastwards to Upington and Kenhardt. It occurs in desert and semi-desert rocky areas where it receives rainfall, if at all, in the winter. It mostly occurs in black rock formations (called ''ysterklip'') which absorbs a lot of heat during the hot summer. (Average summer temp. is 38°C). The rocks anchor the plants which have a spread-root-system. The quiver tree is proof against frost. The copious nectar of its blossoms draws birds and insects as well as baboons that can strip a tree of its flowers in a short time. Being one of the only tree forms in its arid habitat, Aloe dichotoma oftentimes plays host to huge colonial nests of social weaver birds. The plants are usually found growing singly but in some areas the plants grow in large groups, giving the effect of a forest.  It is probably the best known aloe that form an extremely tough tree with densely rounded crown as a result of the repeatedly forked branches. It is one of the biggest members of the genus Aloe and may reach an age of over 80 years and a height of approximately 7(-9) metres with up to 1 m of diameter at ground level. This is one of the most branched and tree-like species of aloe. Smooth, covered with a thin layer of whitish powder that helps to reflect away the hot sun's rays. Typically, the trunk tapers from a thick base towards the top and begins to branch and re-branch dichothocomously at about half way up the trunk, earning the plant its specific epithet for this dichotomous pattern. The bark on the trunk is rather hard and forms beautiful golden brown scales, but beware, the edges of these scales are razor sharp. The pith is soft, light and spongy. About 30cm long and 5cm wide, blue-green, fleshy, bearing a narrow brownish-yellow margins margin of thorns. Leaves are arranged in a spiralled terminal rosette in old plants, but in juvenile plants they are ranked in vertical rows. These rosettes at the tips of the forked branches usually form a dense, rounded crown. In this species the old dry leaves drop off so that the leafy rosettes only remain at the tips of the branches, leaving the rest of their length clean. It has a spread-root-system the roots are somewhat fleshy. The flowers are branch panicles up to 30 cm tall from the base of the peduncle to the apex of the terminal of the raceme. They are bright canary yellow, held close to the leaves, at the tips of the branches, and are fairly short and carried erect. The flowers are rather short and rounded in shape and not nearly as showy as many other species of aloes. Needs well draining soil. Good bright light. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. - 1 @ $20.00

  Aloe humilis 'Blue' - It's a low growing heavily suckering succulent that forms crowded clusters. This clustering aloe is a wonderful little power blue species that has very large blooms compared to the size of the plant. It is a very variable species that remains small through the entire life cycle. Virtually acaulescent (stemless) or very shortly stemmed. Up to 20 cm in diameter. Leaves 20-30 per rosette, short, ascending, small about 7-12 cm long and 1-1,8 cm wide, pale blue-green or grey-green, soft, ovate to triangular shaped, obscurely lineate, very accuminate, incurved, with thin soft white marginal spines about 3 mm long and a gray-green dewy, waxy surface covered with irregularly spaced bumps (tubercules) often arranged in tranverse rows on both the upper and lower surfaces. About 20 pendulous, bright orange-scarlet, tubular up to 4-5 cm long, arranged loosely on top of a 20-35 cm tall spike. Late winter to spring and sometime later. Habitat: South Africa - Western Cape, Eastern Cape. Growing in 3 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3 with pups @ $8.00 each

    Aloe humilis X pratensis 'Toothy' - This is a very large toothed form the are soft. It's a low growing heavily suckering succulent that forms crowded clusters. This clustering aloe is a wonderful little power blue species that has very large blooms compared to the size of the plant. It is a very variable species that remains small through the entire life cycle. Virtually acaulescent (stemless) or very shortly stemmed. Up to 20 cm in diameter. Leaves 20-30 per rosette, short, ascending, small about 7-12 cm long and 1-1,8 cm wide, pale blue-green or grey-green, soft, ovate to triangular shaped, obscurely lineate, very accuminate, incurved, with thin soft white marginal spines about 3 mm long and a gray-green dewy, waxy surface covered with irregularly spaced bumps (tubercules) often arranged in tranverse rows on both the upper and lower surfaces. About 20 pendulous, bright orange-scarlet, tubular up to 4-5 cm long, arranged loosely on top of a 20-35 cm tall spike. Late winter to spring and sometime later. Habitat: South Africa - Western Cape, Eastern Cape. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. Sold Out

    Aloe juvenna - One of my long time faverite Aloes. To keep the nicely stacked leaves and color this aloe need to be grown in very good light. Cool to grow in a hanging basket. Grows on rocky mountainous areas of Kenya. Growing in 3 inch full pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3, #4 @ $10.00 each - Buy 10 for $35.00.   

    Aloe lineata 'Blue Strap Form' - An unusual form of Aloe lineata from an area of Western Cape of the Republic of South Africa. It has blue distichous, strap like leaves instead of the typical rosettes. Needs well draining soil and good bright light. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3 with pups @ $13.00 each

    Aloe 'Sparkling Burgandy' - Small Aloe will have a great burgandy color when grown in good light. Not sure who created this hybrid? Growing in 4 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3 with pups @ $13.00 each

    Aloe sinkiana - Low growing rosettes, forms dence clumps, yellow pom pom flowers. Needs well draining soil and good light. Sudan - Northern Africe. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2 with pups @ $10.00 each #1 Sold

   Aloiampelos tenuior - Formerly: Aloe tenuior is a small to medium-sized, sprawling, bushy shrublet, with a large woody rootstock. It has slender, branching, semi-woody stems, up to 3 m long, that grow upright, but as they grow longer, they tend to need support from surrounding shrubs to remain erect. In time, the plant develops into a mass of intertwined stems, up to about 1.5 m tall with a spread of up to 1.8 m. The leaves are thin to slightly fleshy, blue-green (glaucous), unspotted, and are crowded in lax rosettes at the ends of branches. The leaf margins have small teeth. Growing in a 6 inch pot. 1 @ $30.00

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